New Realism Chinese Art in Florence

Constant Change exhibition at Fortezza da Basso until February 17

Carrie Wang
February 5, 2015

Florence’s Fortezza da Basso hosts the exhibition of Chinese painting “Constant Change” from February 6 to 17, 2015. Its inauguration not only celebrated the upcoming Chinese New Year but also the 45th year of diplomatic relations between Italy and China. The exhibition features 88 works from 39 artists associated with the Sichuan Fine Arts Institute.

 

This is the first exhibition in Italy of works from the Sichuan Fine Arts Institute, which is one of the four most prestigious art academies in China. Participants include famous Chinese artists Zhongli Luo, Maokun Pang and Biao Zhong and young artists Wei Jia, Peng Yao and Wangpei Yong.

 

Dan Luo

 

Dan Luo, Assistant Professor at Sichuan Fine Arts Institute, told The Florentine that most of the works here not only represent contemporary Chinese social context but also describe the origin of this value today. “My works are all about music, and I’m trying to convey the modern vibe of music in a visual context,” Luo said. “But at the same time, you can also find traditional Chinese symbols and traces in my painting. For example, the name of my painting is derived from the title of a poem from the Song Dynasty.” Luo understands the implication of displaying his work outside of China: “I also want audiences from different cultural background to have their own interpretation when they look at my work.”

 

Some works from younger artists are based on historical and current news events, varying from the Chinese Cultural Revolution to the tragic Malaysia MH370 Airline accident. “This series of painting are from a student who recently graduated,” Luo showed us. “He tried to represent his opinion towards current news events through art. For example, he deliberately damaged the top of the painting. In addition, his choice of color helps set the tone of the work.”

 

Maurizio Berlincioni

 

At the opening, we spoke with other members of the crowd about their interest and motivation in seeing the show. Italian photographer Maurizio Berlincioni said he has always been interested in Chinese art; in 1995, he published a book called “Wenzhou-Firenze” based on Chinese immigrants in Prato, Italy. “I’m friends with a couple of Chinese artists here and I think this is a very important event of bringing Chinese art to Italy,” he observed.

 

Artemida Tafa, a student graduate from Florence University came here with a Chinese friend. “Chinese culture is very interesting. I don’t know much about Chinese art, so coming to this event is very eye-opening,” she commented.

 

 

Visitor Information

Costante Cambiamento

Fortezza da Basso, Florence

Until February 17, 2015

 

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