Dantedì: celebrating the father of the Italian language on March 25
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Dantedì: celebrating the father of the Italian language on March 25

This March 25 marks the first annual celebration of Dantedì, when Italy will celebrate Dante Alighieri.

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Mon 23 Mar 2020 11:30 AM

This March 25 marks the first annual celebration of Dantedì, when Italy will celebrate Dante Alighieri. Organized prior to the Covid-19 emergency, the 13th-century Florentine poet is being embraced as a symbol of Italian culture and language to unite the country at this difficult time.

 

 

 

The celebrations will continue all day long online and via social media with performances and readings tagged with #Dantedì and #IoleggoDante.

 

“This first edition occurs at a particularly difficult time,” commented Dario Franceschini, the minister for cultural heritage and activities. “The many initiatives we have planned have been moved to the web. That’s why I’m appealing to artists to read Dante’s words on March 25 and post your activities. Dante embodied the Italian language, as does Italy. That’s why it’s more important than ever to remember him to stay united.”

Schoolteachers throughout Italy will be adding Dante to their virtual lessons on March 25 and everyone in Italy is invited to read the beginning of the Divine Comedy from their windows at 6pm.

 

The Accademia della Crusca will bring together academics who will explain what Dante means to them on the institution’s social media channels and asks the general public to take a selfie with their favourite Dante-dedicated publication, posting a tweet with the official hashtags.

 

At 8:30pm, turn into Firenze Tv, the new Youtube cultural channel managed by the Fondazione Teatro della Toscana, for an evening devoted to Dante with readings from the Divine Comedy.

 

 

 

Francesca da Rimini in Dante’s Inferno (1810), by Nicola Monti (Pistoia 1780 – Cortona 1864). Oil on canvas, 168x121cm

 

 

 

The Uffizi celebrates Dante by acquiring Francesco da Rimini in Dante’s Inferno, a masterpiece created by the early Romantic artist Nicola Monti in his youth. Dante lovers can also take a look at the virtual exhibition “Dantesque Images from the Uffizi” and tour the medieval bowels of the world-famous gallery.

 

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