“Verrocchio: Master of Leonardo” at Palazzo Strozzi

Spring exhibition dedicated to influential 15th-century artist

Editorial Staff
March 7, 2019 - 15:32

The first comprehensive retrospective devoted to Andrea del Verrocchio opens at Palazzo Strozzi on March 9, with an accompanying section at the Bargello Museum, both running until July 14, 2019. The exhibition brings together masterpieces by the 15th-century artist, contextualized with works from his forefathers and peers, as well as by the pupils he trained, including Leonardo da Vinci, Pietro Perugino, Domenico Ghirlandaio and Sandro Botticelli.

 

 

  

Ph. Alexandra Korey for The Florentine

 

 

“Verrocchio: Master of Leonardo” at Palazzo Strozzi

Spring exhibition dedicated to influential 15th-century artist

The first comprehensive retrospective devoted to Andrea del Verrocchio opens at Palazzo Strozzi on March 9, with an accompanying section at the Bargello Museum, both running until July 14, 2019. The exhibition brings
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A master of many art forms, from sculpture to painting, metalworking to drawing, Verrocchio played a crucial role in the development of the arts in 15th-century Florence, his workshop becoming a hotbed of collaboration, exchange and co-working, where the language and style of Renaissance art was forged.

 

 

“We have been working for almost five years,” said Arturo Galansino, director general of the Fondazione Palazzo Strozzi, “to enable Palazzo Strozzi to host this major exhibition showcasing the multi-faceted talents and activities of Verrocchio and his workshop, whilst simultaneously exploring the genius of Leonardo da Vinci in the very year in which Florence and Tuscany are set to become iconic venues for the international celebrations dedicated to commemorating the 500th anniversary of his death.”

 

 

Ph. Alexandra Korey for The Florentine

 

 

Curated by Francesco Caglioti and Andrea De Marchi, and staged in collaboration with the National Gallery in Washington, the exhibition vaunts over 120 paintings, sculptures and drawings, made possible thanks to loans from more than 70 major museums and private collections around the world, including the Met in New York, the Louvre in Paris and the Victoria & Albert Museum in London.

 

 

An additional section of the exhibition is being held at the Bargello Museum, where visitors can admire two sections dedicated to the image of Christ, centred around Verrocchio’s bronze masterpiece Incredulity of St. Thomas, which has been moved to the Bargello from its permanent home in Orsanmichele for the duration of the show.

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